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Posts for tag: oral health

By Mark L Randall, DMD
March 18, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
HelpYourChildDevelopGoodOralHabitsandAvoidBadOnes

We all have habits: things we do every day often without consciously thinking. Some of them are good; some not so much. And many of them took root in childhood.

That's why it's important to help your children form good habits in their formative years, especially regarding oral health. Here are 4 areas to focus on developing good dental habits — and avoiding bad ones.

Keep teeth and gums clean. The best defense against dental disease is stopping plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles, from building up on tooth surfaces. That means brushing and flossing each day, along with regular dental cleanings and checkups. You should begin cleaning your child's teeth as soon as they appear in the mouth with a clean towel or rag at first and later brushing them. Eventually, teach your children to brush and floss for themselves. Dental visits should also begin around their first birthday.

A nutritious diet equals healthy teeth. The saying, “You are what you eat,” is especially true about teeth. Help your child form a nutritious diet habit by providing meals rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, quality protein and dairy products. You should also restrict their sugar intake, a primary food for bacteria that cause tooth decay; try to limit sweets to mealtimes and avoid constant snacking.

Avoid habits with hidden dangers. Actually, this one is about you — and what you might be doing to increase your child's risk for dental disease. Avoid actions that increase the chances of transmitting oral bacteria from you to your infant, like kissing on the lips or licking a pacifier to clean it. You should also avoid giving your child night-time bottles or sippy cups filled with milk, formula or any sweetened liquid — likewise for pacifiers dipped in something sweet.

Steer them away from future bad habits. As children become teenagers, they're eager to stretch their wings. While this is normal and good, they can get into habits with dire consequences for oral health. You should by all means steer them away from tobacco use or oral piercings (tongue and lip bolts especially can wreak havoc on tooth structure) that can harm their teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on dental care for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”

By Mark L Randall, DMD
February 26, 2019
Category: Oral Health
ExpertAdviceVivicaAFoxonKissingandOralhealth

Is having good oral hygiene important to kissing? Who's better to answer that question than Vivica A. Fox? Among her other achievements, the versatile actress won the “Best Kiss” honor at the MTV Movie Awards, for a memorable scene with Will Smith in the 1996 blockbuster Independence Day. When Dear Doctor magazine asked her, Ms. Fox said that proper oral hygiene was indeed essential. Actually, she said:

"Ooooh, yes, yes, yes, Honey, 'cause Baby, if you kiss somebody with a dragon mouth, my God, it's the worst experience ever as an actor to try to act like you enjoy it!"

And even if you're not on stage, it's no fun to kiss someone whose oral hygiene isn't what it should be. So what's the best way to step up your game? Here's how Vivica does it:

“I visit my dentist every three months and get my teeth cleaned, I floss, I brush, I just spent two hundred bucks on an electronic toothbrush — I'm into dental hygiene for sure.”

Well, we might add that you don't need to spend tons of money on a toothbrush — after all, it's not the brush that keeps your mouth healthy, but the hand that holds it. And not everyone needs to come in as often every three months. But her tips are generally right on.

For proper at-home oral care, nothing beats brushing twice a day for two minutes each time, and flossing once a day. Brushing removes the sticky, bacteria-laden plaque that clings to your teeth and causes tooth decay and gum disease — not to mention malodorous breath. Don't forget to brush your tongue as well — it can also harbor those bad-breath bacteria.

While brushing is effective, it can't reach the tiny spaces in between teeth and under gums where plaque bacteria can hide. But floss can: That's what makes it so important to getting your mouth really clean.

Finally, regular professional checkups and cleanings are an essential part of good oral hygiene. Why? Because even the most dutiful brushing and flossing can't remove the hardened coating called tartar that eventually forms on tooth surfaces. Only a trained health care provider with the right dental tools can! And when you come in for a routine office visit, you'll also get a thorough checkup that can detect tooth decay, gum disease, and other threats to your oral health.

Bad breath isn't just a turn-off for kissing — It can indicate a possible problem in your mouth. So listen to what award-winning kisser Vivica Fox says: Paying attention to your oral hygiene can really pay off! For more information, contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can read the entire interview with Vivica A. Fox in Dear Doctor's latest issue.

By Mark L Randall, DMD
September 08, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   cancer  
LookAfterYourTeethDuringCancerTreatmenttoAvoidDentalDisease

Cancer treatment can be an all-out battle with intense side effects for your entire body. One particular area that can suffer is your mouth.

Chemotherapy and radiation target and destroy cancer cells, which can lead to non-cancerous cells caught in the crossfire and also destroyed. The salivary glands in the mouth are prone to such damage, which could greatly impact your ability to ward off dental disease.

Saliva, what salivary glands produce, plays a major role in oral health. The bodily fluid disseminates antibodies throughout the mouth that fight disease-causing bacteria. It also neutralizes acid, which can erode tooth enamel, and helps restore lost minerals to the enamel.

If the salivary glands become damaged, however, they may produce less saliva and create a condition called xerostomia or “dry mouth.” This is a common occurrence for cancer patients, which can rob them of saliva’s benefits and make them more susceptible to tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease. The end result could be tooth loss.

There are things you and your dentist can do to prevent this. First, have a complete dental checkup before undergoing cancer treatment. If at all possible have any necessary dental work undertaken (with adequate recovery time afterward) before beginning chemo or radiation. Your dentist and oncologist (cancer specialist) may need to coordinate any planned dental work.

You should also practice daily oral hygiene with brushing and flossing, along with keeping up your regular dental cleanings. This will prevent the buildup on teeth of bacterial plaque, which in turn will reduce your chances for dental disease. Your dentist may also prescribe antibacterial as well as fluoride mouth rinses to help limit the growth of oral bacteria.

To minimize dry mouth, increase your water consumption as much as possible. You may also use saliva boosters like xylitol, an alcohol-based sweetener found in many gums or mints that promotes salivation (it also deters oral bacterial growth).

And don’t forget to maintain a healthy diet, which will not only benefit your stamina during cancer treatment but can also help you maintain better dental health. Providing good care for your mouth during this trying time will help ensure your teeth and gums stay as healthy as possible.

If you would like more information on oral care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Health During Cancer Treatment.”

By Mark L Randall, DMD
August 29, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
OralHealthCanProveChallenginginYourSeniorYears

A focus on dental care in senior citizens is just as important as it is for children. Indeed, oral health in your later years can be a major factor in your quality of life.

For one, aging effects on other parts of the body can make dental care more challenging. Some hygiene tasks once performed easily become harder — arthritis, for example, or loss of muscle strength may make it difficult to hold a toothbrush or floss. In such cases, you may need to find new ways to make the task easier: a power toothbrush with a larger handle; pre-loaded floss holders or a water flosser; or adaptations to a manual brush to make it easier to hold, like attaching a tennis ball or bike handle.

Other age-related conditions — and their treatments — can negatively impact oral health. Less saliva production, which is a consequence of aging or certain drugs, increases the risk of tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease. Older adults often develop gastric reflux problems that can introduce tooth enamel-eroding stomach acid into the mouth. And medications called bisphosphonates, often prescribed to treat osteoporosis, may interfere in rare cases with bone healing after tooth extraction or similar procedures.

Prior dental work can also prove challenging to treating dental disease. It becomes more difficult to preserve teeth threatened with decay if there are significant restorations or appliances to work around. Pain perception can also diminish with age, so that dental disease may not be noticed until later stages when significant damage has already occurred.

Oral care requires more attention as we grow older, or as we care for older family members. Your best defense against disease is to continue regular six-month visits with us. In addition to normal cleanings and checkups, we’ll also screen for oral cancer (a more prevalent occurrence in older adults), review your prescriptions or other supplements and medications for any possible side effects to oral health, check the fit of any dentures or other restorations and evaluate the effectiveness of your hygiene.

While other age-related conditions may capture the majority of your attention, you shouldn’t allow that to neglect your dental care. With your continued efforts, along with our support and your family’s, you can continue to enjoy good oral health throughout your lifetime.

If you would like more information on dental care for senior adults, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Mark L Randall, DMD
July 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
ThinkWaterFirstforSummerThirst

It’s easy to work up a thirst in the summer. You might be shooting hoops in the park, riding on a trail or playing volleyball on the beach. No matter what your favorite summertime activity is, outdoor fun can leave you dry—and then it’s time to reach for a cold one. But when your body craves hydration, what’s the best thing to drink?

The answer’s simple: water!

Sure, we’ve all seen those ads for so-called “energy” and “sports” drinks. But do you know what’s really in them? Sports drinks (all of those different “…ades”) are mostly water with some sugars, salts and acids. “Energy” drinks (often promoted as “dietary supplements” to avoid labeling requirements) also contain plenty of acids and sugars—and sometimes extremely high levels of caffeine!

Studies have shown the acid in both sports and energy drinks has the potential to erode the hard enamel coating of your teeth, making them more susceptible to decay and damage. And the sugar they contain feeds the harmful oral bacteria that cause tooth decay. So you could say that the ingredients in these beverages are a one-two punch aimed right at your smile.

It’s a similar story for sodas and other soft drinks, which often have high levels of sugar. In fact, some popular iced teas have 23 grams (almost 6 teaspoons) of sugar per 8-ounce serving—and a single 24-ounce can holds 3 servings! Many diet sodas (and some fruit juices) are acidic, and may damage your tooth enamel.

Water, on the other hand, has no acid and no sugar. It has no calories and no caffeine. Simple and refreshing, water gives your body the hydration it craves, with no unnecessary ingredients that can harm it. In fact, if you fill a reusable bottle from your own tap, you may not only benefit from cavity-fighting fluoride that’s added to most municipal tap water…you’ll also be helping the environment by cutting down on unnecessary packaging.

It’s best to drink water all of the time—but if you don’t, here are a few tips: If you want to enjoy the occasional soda or soft drink, try to limit it to around mealtimes so your mouth isn’t constantly bathed in sugar and acid. Swish some water around your mouth afterward to help neutralize the acidity of the drinks. And wait at least an hour before brushing your teeth; otherwise you might remove tooth enamel that has been softened by acids.

What you drink can have a big effect on your oral health—and your overall health. So when thirst strikes, reach for a cold glass of water. It can help keep you healthy this summer…and all year long.

If you would like more information about nutrition and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Think Before You Drink” and “Nutrition & Oral Health.”